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Jacksonville fireworks show canceled after shell explosion injures worker

Jacksonville fireworks show canceled after shell explosion injures worker

Jacksonville fireworks show canceled after shell explosion injures worker

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Authorities in a northeastern Alabama city canceled its Fourth of July fireworks show Thursday after a technician was injured when a projectile accidentally detonated.

“A firework projectile unexpectedly detonated while being set up; there was no power source connected to the device, which is normally detonated using computer-activated electric match technology,” the city of Jacksonville posted on its Facebook page.

Jacksonville is a community of approximately 14,000 residents in Calhoun County, Alabama, about 75 miles northeast of Birmingham.

“Tonight’s fireworks show at Jax Fest has been cancelled,” the city’s post reads.

“During the loading of the fireworks, an accidental discharge occurred which injured the workers who were shooting off the fireworks,” the Jacksonville Fire Department wrote in a separate statement on its Facebook page. “Our thoughts and prayers are with him and his family.”

Authorities said the technician was transported by medical helicopter to a hospital in stable condition.

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In a subsequent post on its social media page, the city said the injured coach was expected to recover.

“We have received word that the fireworks technician who was injured last night at Jax Fest has been released from UAB Hospital today and is heading home with his co-worker,” the post read. “Thank you to everyone who had him in their thoughts and prayers!”

Last year’s injury report:

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 9,700 people were treated in emergency rooms in the United States last year and eight people died from fireworks-related deaths.

To use fireworks safely, the National Safety Council recommends viewing them in public displays performed by professionals and not using them at home.

Natalie Neysa Alund is a senior reporter for USA TODAY. Contact her at [email protected] and follow her on X @nataliealund.