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Uttar Pradesh’s wolf population is at carrying capacity; Michigan DNR advocates for delisting species

Uttar Pradesh’s wolf population is at carrying capacity; Michigan DNR advocates for delisting species

Uttar Pradesh’s wolf population is at carrying capacity; Michigan DNR advocates for delisting species

The wolf population in the Upper Peninsula has reached the limit of what the habitat can support, according to the Michigan DNR.

That’s one of the findings of a hibernation study that found a minimum of 762 wolves living in the Upper Peninsula.

This figure is the highest population estimate since 2012.

However, it is within a range that has been constant for the past 14 years.

At the same time, this is almost certainly an undercount of the true wolf population.

“We count wolves when they’re at the lowest point in their population cycle. When spring comes around, with the birth of pups and that sort of thing, the population is going to increase. It’s going to peak around July or August. Then, it’s going to start losing animals. Then, it’s going to come back around mid-winter when it’s at its lowest point again,” said DNR large carnivore specialist Brian Roell.

To arrive at the estimate, the DNR uses wolf tracks in the snow.

“It’s a trail survey, so it’s both intensive (time-consuming and effort-intensive) and very extensive (involving a lot of searching by truck, snowmobile, snowshoe and even cross-country skis),” Roell said.

Wolves are currently on the federal endangered species list.

This means that states like Michigan have no power to manage their numbers.

Furthermore, wolves may only be killed if they pose a direct and immediate threat to human life.

However, due to stable population numbers, the Michigan DNR has long advocated for removing wolves from the endangered species list.

“This suggests that we are reaching that biological carrying capacity and we are just seeing oscillations around it. This population is very stable. It is safe. We have maintained this number for the last 14 years,” Roell said.

The DNR is unsure whether wolves exist in the Lower Peninsula.

The last survey of Wisconsin’s wolf population, conducted last year, estimated there were about 1,000 wolves in the state.