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Drivers outraged by on-street parking law that gives them ‘rights’ in busy Australian suburb

Drivers outraged by on-street parking law that gives them ‘rights’ in busy Australian suburb

Drivers outraged by on-street parking law that gives them ‘rights’ in busy Australian suburb

In Australia’s built-up suburbs, on-street parking is becoming increasingly difficult to find, so one local man appears to have taken steps to ensure he gets a spot outside his home. The move has angered neighbours who are also competing for a parking spot on the busy street.

A resident of Leichhardt, in Sydney’s inner west, has allegedly been reserving a parking spot on the street near his home for “months”, using orange traffic cones to cordon off enough space for at least two cars. “A resident has been using witches hats to reserve parking,” one frustrated man wrote on social media.

“This has been going on for months and does not appear to be related to a renovation.”

The street in question has no time restrictions, meaning that residents can park for free as long as they can get ahead of their neighbours to get a spot. “There are not enough parking spaces,” the man wrote.

After highlighting the issue online, drivers shared their opinion on the tactic, with many objecting and suggesting the neighbour simply move the traffic cones out of the way.

“Take them off when they’re not around, someone will park there,” one person commented, while another said they had experienced something similar in a neighbouring suburb, with others calling it “outrageous” and “rude”.

A local resident said she had also seen the cones and was upset by them. “I’ve been noticing them for months and wondering why people were staring at them so much. I guess if you think you’re entitled to anything and can get away with anything…” she said.

Another was in favour of the move, saying everyone else was just in a bad mood and residents should be able to “reserve a space outside their house”.

Inner West Council has confirmed that reserving on-street parking in this way is not permitted and residents are not permitted to leave belongings, such as a traffic cone, in public areas.

“Unfortunately, this type of thing does happen in our local government area,” a spokesman said. “Fines for this type of offence range from $330 to $660.”

The belongings must not obstruct public use of the services nor be left unattended, as in this case the orange cones are. “The council encourages anyone who observes this type of activity to report it to us so that we can investigate,” said the spokesman.

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