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Here’s how to avoid it

Here’s how to avoid it

FILE - This image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows a colored transmission electron micrograph of monkeypox particles (red) found inside an infected cell (blue), grown in the laboratory that were captured and enhanced with color at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility (IRF) at Fort Detrick, Maryland.  Scientists say a new form of mpox detected in a Congo mining town could spread more easily among people.  Congo is already experiencing its largest mox outbreak, with more than 19,000 suspected infections and 900 deaths.  (NIAID via AP, File)

FILE – This image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows a colored transmission electron micrograph of monkeypox particles (red) found inside an infected cell (blue), grown in the laboratory that were captured and enhanced with color at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility (IRF) at Fort Detrick, Maryland. Scientists say a new form of mpox detected in a Congo mining town could spread more easily among people. Congo is already experiencing its largest mox outbreak, with more than 19,000 suspected infections and 900 deaths. (NIAID via AP, File)

After local health officials announced a “concerning increase” in cases of mpox, or monkeypox, in Los Angeles County earlier this week, officials continue to urge residents to stay safe before the first end official summer week.

On Monday, local health officials said 10 new cases had been reported, a concerning increase from the recent countywide average of less than two cases per week.


Mpox is primarily transmitted through close contact with bodily fluids, shared bedding, towels, clothing, or through kissing, coughing, and hugging.

The virus can also be transmitted during intimate contact with people or close contact with infected animals.

Symptoms of the virus can include a rash that looks like a pimple or blister but may be painful or itchy, fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, exhaustion, muscle and back pain, and headaches, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Symptoms usually last up to four weeks. Mpox is not life-threatening, but can cause serious illness, according to the health organization.

To avoid contracting the virus, local health officials recommend the following:

  • Get vaccinated, especially those in risk groups.
  • Take preventive measures during sexual activity
  • Symptom testing

Health care providers should report any suspected cases to Public Health.