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General election: “Don’t return matches to arsonists,” Labor Party urges amid warning of complacency in polls |  Politics News

General election: “Don’t return matches to arsonists,” Labor Party urges amid warning of complacency in polls | Politics News

General election: “Don’t return matches to arsonists,” Labor Party urges amid warning of complacency in polls |  Politics News

A cabinet minister insists the election is “not a thing of the past” and repeats his party’s warning that a vote for Nigel Farage’s Reform UK would give Sir Keir Starmer a huge majority and “a blank cheque.” “in office.


Sunday June 16, 2024 10:33, United Kingdom

Wes Streeting has urged voters not to hand “the parties back to the arsonists to finish the job” and warned against complacency in the face of polls predicting a landslide Labor victory.

Speaking to Sky News Sunday Morning with Trevor PhillipsThe shadow health secretary highlighted the election in the choice calling the Tory manifesto “Liz Truss’ budget on steroids” and raising the prospect of “a Downing Street nightmare” if the ruling party returns.

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Streeting made his comments as new polls indicated a bleaker outlook for the Prime Minister. Rishi Sunakone of which indicates that the conservatives are on their way to get only 72 seats.

Meanwhile, Cabinet minister Mark Harper insisted the Conservatives were fighting for every vote, but repeated his party’s warning that a vote for UK Reform would give Labour a large majority and “a blank check” in power.

It comes after a separate poll conducted Thursday night Nigel Farage’s party leads the Conservatives for the first time with 19% of the votes, compared to 18% for the conservatives.

Mr Streeting said: “I’m just warning people, in this context of astonishing media complacency about opinion polls, not to hand the matches back to the arsonist to finish the job.”

He added: “Do people want to see Liz Truss’ mini budget on steroids, which is the Conservative manifesto, delivered if there is a nightmare in Downing Street on July 5 or do they want to see a stable economy with economic growth, shared prosperity, allowing us “invest in our public services without hitting workers with taxes, that’s the choice in this election.”

Read more on Sky News:
Conservatives heading for ‘war’, Farage predicts
How much would a Labor government change football?
Witness: Behind the scenes of the election campaign coverage

Despite the polls, Harper told Phillips: “I’m still very prepared for this fight.

“The Conservative Party across the country, led by the Prime Minister, is fighting for every vote.”

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He added: “But the polls do tell us one thing. They show people that if people don’t vote Conservative and some people vote for the smaller parties, and Labor ends up with a very large majority, it’s going to have a blank check.

“They are trying very hard in this campaign not to clearly explain how they are going to pay for any of their promises. We know there is a black hole. We can have a debate about how big it is.”

“We’ve said it will be £2,000 for every family in the next parliament, but there is definitely a black hole.

“We’ve set taxes that might have to be raised and they haven’t ruled them out.”

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Mr Harper continued: “I would say very simply to those voters who are thinking about voting for reform and who have voted Conservative: you want to see lower taxes, you want to see migration under control, if you vote for reform, you will “If they get a Labor government with a large majority, they will get the opposite of what they want.”

Harper also insisted that the election was “not about the past.”

He said: “Elections are about the future. They are about the offer before us.”